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etching at home

The Elmhurst Art Museum currently has an exhibit of works by Lee Sturges, a printmaker from Elmhurst, Illinois. My full review of the exhibition is in the works. I was doing a little research on Lee and found out that he built his own custom etching press in 1916.

Printmaking was alot of fun in college, especially in the days of Ann Taulbee/Murakishi. However, many of my classmates, including myself, “engraved” the thought in our minds that we couldn’t seriously make a livelihood based on printmaking. The thought of building a custom etching press never crossed my mind.

This changes the whole ball game… well except for the whole acid part of etching. That’s quite tricky. I wonder how Lee Sturges handled all the acid in his home studio.

Actually, Henrik Boegh published a book in 2003 on less toxic ways to do printmaking. See bottom of the list of links below. Though it seems Keith Howard beat Henrik to the punch. He published his non-toxic printmaking book in 1998. Again, see bottom of list for link. I experienced a nitric acid burn on the face in college while working the printmaking shop, so non-toxic printmaking sounds very soothing.

overview of Lee Sturges show at Elmhurst Art Musuem

Just buy your own press. 998 Euros (about $1400)

Search Google for homemade printmaking press

printmaking links galore! though many link to places in Europe. and many of the links are dead.

general info about do-it-yourself printmaking

Electroetch doesn’t use biohazardous material such as nitric acid. Though there’s no info on where to buy this stuff. It looks to be copyrighted and only accessible though the Contact section of their website.

review of Keith Howard’s book, “The Contemporary Printmaker, Intaglio-Type & Acrylic Resist Etching” published in 2003. Also has a link to site selling the book. $49.50 plus $5.50 shipping. Claims itself to be “The Contemporary Printmaking Bible”.

Keith Howard’s “Non-toxic Intaglio Printmaking” published in 1998. out of print?

Buy the book, “Handbook of Non-Toxic Intaglio” by Henrik Boegh. it’s $32.95.

7 Responses to etching at home

  1. Laura K. March 18, 2005 at 8:43 pm #

    i’m making a 48-page book in my Intermediate Typography class. my teacher operates his own letterpress [we are not using letterpress for the book, that would be nuts. i’m just saying, he’s a bit of a bookmaking crazy fan] in Evanston. we are writing, illustrating, binding, printing, and dustjacketing this book ourselves. so far, we’ve created a publishing house and logo, written the text, created illustrations, and currently we are designing page layouts for the various sections. the subject of the book? a history of typographers. i wrote the sections on Eric Gill and T-26.

    this is not really about printmaking. your mention of presses made me think of my book project, that’s all.

  2. Matt Maldre March 20, 2005 at 11:50 pm #

    all this printmaking stuff! i just want to know what year Cecil Fielder hit 51 homeruns. He did it with his voodoo potions of eating squirrels, y’know.

  3. Laura K. March 21, 2005 at 10:17 am #

    well, it’s not your blog. on your blog, you can talk about baseball. on moose’s blog, we should comment on the interests in his posts. it’s proper blog etiquette.

  4. Tom Saaristo March 21, 2005 at 3:51 pm #

    I’m interested in both!

    Cecil hit 51 home runs with the Detroit Tigers in 1990

  5. Matt Maldre March 22, 2005 at 7:51 am #

    If you were to do an itaglio etching of Cecil Fielder, you’d have to use TWO plates to cover this big guy.

  6. Erik Maldre.com March 22, 2005 at 1:43 pm #

    one plate for his large a55 and on plate for the rest of cecil.

  7. Laura K. March 22, 2005 at 6:07 pm #

    moose, you should visit the Center for Book and Paper Arts at Columbia College. i think you would love it.

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